SVP Technology at First Data Corp; large scale system architecture, infrastructure, tech geek, reading, learning, hiking, GeoCaching, ham radio, married, kids
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Infrastructure-as-Code, NETCONF and REST API

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This is the third blog post in “thinking out loud while preparing Network Infrastructure as Code presentation for the network automation course” series. You might want to start with Network-Infrastructure-as-Code Is Nothing New and Adjusting System State blog posts.

As I described in the previous blog post, the hardest problem any infrastructure-as-code (IaC) tool must solve is “how to adjust current system state to desired state described in state definition file(s)”… preferably without restarting or rebuilding the system.

There are two approaches to adjusting system state:

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JayM
5 minutes ago
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Atlanta, GA
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Cloudflare adds new "one-click" DNSSEC setup to make it far more difficult to spoof websites, likely increasing the protocol's woeful adoption rate (Zack Whittaker/TechCrunch)

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Zack Whittaker / TechCrunch:
Cloudflare adds new “one-click” DNSSEC setup to make it far more difficult to spoof websites, likely increasing the protocol's woeful adoption rate  —  Bad news first: the internet is broken for a while.  The good news is that Cloudflare thinks it can make it slightly less broken.

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JayM
8 hours ago
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Atlanta, GA
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Sesame Street writer confirms Bert and Ernie were a couple

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With that “mystery” solved, how about we get an OPENLY gay or trans Muppet?

After decades of rumors and speculation, a writer for Sesame Street has confirmed that Bert and Ernie were indeed a couple.

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JayM
8 hours ago
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Atlanta, GA
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Sorry, But There's No Such Thing as the "Clean Part" of Moldy Bread — Food News

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samuel shared this story from Kitchn | Inspiring cooks, nourishing homes:
Uh-oh

We've all been through this scenario: you get hungry, stroll over to the kitchen, and decide you'll make the perfect sandwich — layered with your favorite deli meat (or veggies), a slice of lettuce, some tomato, a dab of mayonnaise (which is not dead for this millennial) — all in between your favorite sliced bread.

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JayM
8 hours ago
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Atlanta, GA
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Review: HP’s Chromebook x2 could convince me to go all-in on Chrome OS

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Article intro image

Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino)

As the public embraces Chrome OS, OEMs have begun to incorporate Google's operating system into their products in new ways. Soon, Chromebooks won't be just the cheap laptops you buy for your kids as an alternative to a more expensive macOS or Windows machine—or for yourself as a secondary device. HP's $599 Chromebook x2 is one of the first higher-end Chrome OS devices to come out, not to mention one of the first Chrome OS tablets available, too.

HP designed the Chromebook x2 to elevate the Chrome OS experience, similarly to how Google's own Pixelbook handles the OS. The x2 is built with premium materials and packed with better internals than most Chromebooks, making it a good option for Chrome OS enthusiasts. At $599 for the tablet plus its keyboard and stylus, the Chromebook x2 isn't trying to be the most affordable Chromebook—rather, it's trying to appeal to those who want a premium Chromebook that balances style, versatility, and power.

Look and feel

Aside from Google's Pixelbook, the Chromebook x2 is the most luxurious Chrome OS device I've ever held. The tablet's weightiness struck me as soon as I took it out of the box, and its metal edges combined with ceramic white back finish make it a very handsome device. HP achieved the white color using the same anodized electrodeposition method used in previous Spectre laptops, showing that the company didn't cut any corners, instead breaking the plastic-clamshell shackles that once restrained Google's operating system.

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JayM
17 hours ago
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Wonder if it will run Linux..... easily that is.
Atlanta, GA
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Cloudflare’s new ‘one-click’ DNSSEC setup will make it far more difficult to spoof websites

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Bad news first: the internet is broken for a while. The good news is that Cloudflare thinks it can make it slightly less broken.

With “the click of one button,” the networking giant said Tuesday, its users can now switch on DNSSEC in their dashboard. In doing so, Cloudflare hopes it removes a major pain-point in adopting the web security standard, which many haven’t set up — either because it’s so complicated and arduous, or too expensive.

It’s part of a push by the San Francisco-based networking giant to try to make the pipes of the internet more secure — even from the things you can’t see.

For years, you could open up a website and take its instant availability for granted. DNS, which translates web addresses into computer-readable IP addresses, has been plagued with vulnerabilities, making it easy to hijack any step of the process to surreptitiously send users to fake or malicious sites.

Take two incidents in the past year — where traffic to and from Amazon and separately Google, Facebook, Apple, and Microsoft were hijacked and rerouted for between minutes and hours at a time. Terabytes of internet traffic were siphoned through Russia for reasons that are still unknown. Any non-encrypted traffic was readable, at least in theory, by the Russian government. Suspicious? It was.

That’s where a security-focused DNS evolution — DNSSEC — is meant to help. It’s like DNS, but it protects requests end-to-end, from computer or mobile device to the web server of the site you’re trying to visit, by cryptographically signing the data so that it’s far tougher — if not impossible — to spoof.

But DNSSEC adoption is woefully low. Just three percent of websites in the Fortune 1000 sign their primary domains, largely because the domain owners can’t be bothered, but also because their DNS operators either don’t support it or charge exorbitant rates for the privilege.

Cloudflare now wants to do the hard work in setting those crucial DS records, a necessary component in setting up DNSSEC, for customers on a supported registrar. Traditionally, setting a DS record has been notoriously difficult, often because the registrars themselves can be problematic.

As of launch, Gandi will be the first registrar to support one-click DNSSEC setup, with more expected to follow.

The more registrars that support the move, the fewer barriers to a safer internet, the company argues. Right now, the company says that services that users should consider switching from providers don’t support DNSSEC and “let them know that was the reason for the switch.”

Just like HTTPS was slow to adopt over the years — but finally took off in 2015 — there’s hope that DNSSEC can follow the same fate. The more companies that adoption the technology will help end users be less vulnerable to DNS attacks on the internet.

And besides the hackers, who doesn’t want that?

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JayM
17 hours ago
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