SVP Technology at First Data Corp; large scale system architecture, infrastructure, tech geek, reading, learning, hiking, GeoCaching, ham radio, married, kids
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Today’s hero is the former NASA engineer who built a glitter bomb booby trap for Amazon package thieves

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Not all heroes wear capes.

If you live in a heavily trafficked area, there’s a good chance you’ve fallen prey to the Amazon thief–the person who sees a package on your doorstep and steals it. Engineer Mark Rober has experienced this, too. In a YouTube video he uploaded yesterday, he showed us his form of revenge.

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JayM
3 hours ago
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Love this.
Atlanta, GA
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How to watch the four rocket launches today, including SpaceX and Blue Origin

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Elon Musk’s SpaceX, Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin, France’s Arianespace, and Boeing’s and Lockheed Martin’s United Launch Alliance all have scheduled lift-off’s today.

It’s a historic day of sorts for the rocket industry. A record-breaking four different rockets will all launch today, but each rocket is being launched by a different company, reports Bloomberg. Elon Musk’s SpaceX, Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin, France’s Arianespace, and Boeing’s and Lockheed Martin’s United Launch Alliance all have scheduled lift-offs today–and you can watch them all.

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JayM
3 hours ago
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Cool
Atlanta, GA
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Leadership is about coaching. Here’s how to do it well.

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You can start with one simple behavior change that will bring a massive impact.

If you’re a leader or a manager, you probably wear a lot of hats. You’re a project manager, delegator, spokesperson, and most importantly, a coach. But the problem is that no one ever tells you how to be an effective coach, or even what that means. Are you supposed to act like a sports coach? A therapist? Perform some bizarre (and arcane) HR ritual?

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JayM
2 days ago
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Yeap
Atlanta, GA
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Why being a manager is a career change, not a promotion

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This Buffer engineer shares some of the surprising lessons and takeaways of transitioning from an individual contributor to a manager.

Almost two years ago, I fell into becoming a manager.

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JayM
3 days ago
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Pretty good article
Atlanta, GA
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The upheaval around massive financial, political and technological changes could get worse

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samuel shared this story from Axios:
I don't buy that we're on a path to civil war. If sides aren't geographic, then there are no sides.

Rarely has the world witnessed so much unsettling change so fast in so many nations for so many reasons.

  • A torrential decade has unleashed massive financial, political and technological crises, crises of trust, truth and untethered populations.
  • People are irate and balkanized, and provocateurs, itching to make them more so, keep stirring the pot.

Why it matters: Never in recent memory has the danger of some imminent, undefined catastrophe felt so genuinely palpable.


The big picture: It's important to step back and think deeply about the currents running through this moment of history — and what could come next.

I chose among the most disturbing and conspicuous dynamics of the period — the extreme anger all around (most recently in France and Brazil), and, everywhere, the urge to create "others" in society.

My guide was "The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War," Yale historian Joanne Freeman's exploration of the last time Americans were so divided — the decisive three decades leading up to the war that tore the U.S. apart.

The bad news: If there is a lesson in these years, it is that our circumstances can get worse. It was a time of extreme, polarized U.S. politics, strange and vicious conspiracy theories, and cutthroat media that amplified all the noise.

  • Eventually, the Civil War closed in, even though “no one at the time thought it was inevitable. People were trying to protect their interests without blowing up the whole thing,” Freeman told me.
  • When people worry about the divided country, that’s what they are really asking: Whether that 19th century past is in store for us — a new national conflagration, the result of never having figured out how to reconcile our differences. Are we mere tribes, seeking advantage and to hell with the other guy?
“I’m not saying we are marching into civil war. But you can see the power that conspiracy theories can have and how people can be swept into them.”
Joanne Freeman

The book's title refers to an 1856 letter written by abolitionist John Turner Sargent, calling the floor of Congress "that field of blood."

  • From around 1830 on, Congress was a practice ground for the Civil War — "a den of braggarts and brawlers, a place of sectional conflict waged by sectional champions," Freeman writes. Representatives regularly punched, knifed, threatened — and once shot and killed each other.
  • This was not seen as unusual — because the U.S. was an extraordinarily violent place. Voters demanded such displays of loyalty to conviction. "Nothing but denunciation and defiance seem to be tolerated by the masses," a former Northern congressman wrote. If you failed to be angry enough, you could be summarily voted out.
  • They were fighting less for a moral cause than their section of the country — their tribe, in today's parlance. They felt their region's honor at stake.

Ultimately, as we know, the impulse was not honor or gallantry, but slavery. At the same time the British Empire abolished slavery (1833), there were auction blocks and slave pens right in D.C. Shackled slave gangs were marched along the capital's streets.

  • In 1865, an unambiguous conclusion to the war was the only way to break the fever.
  • Freeman says rightly that she's produced a window to what can happen when people become trapped in their own polarized politics and "can't see their way out."
  • "As violent and strife-ridden as the nation and its politics continued to be, a new day was at hand."


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JayM
3 days ago
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Atlanta, GA
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Palette update brings its physical editing interface to Capture One on MacOS

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Palette, a modular collection of buttons, dials and sliders designed to give photo editing a more tactile experience, has received an update making it compatible with Capture One 11 and 12 on MacOS computers.

The new support, which comes in the form of a software update to the proprietary PaletteApp, gives 'access to hundreds of Capture One function items.' Like their Adobe counterparts, Capture One users can now use the modular sliders, dials and buttons to adjust nearly every detail of an image with a more tactile approach.

On its FAQ page, Palette Gear addresses the lack of Windows support saying, 'Simply put, the macOS release of Capture One offers developer tools that the Windows release does not. Our aim is full Capture One support on both platforms; we don't play favourites. After careful consideration, we made the decision to offer Capture One support for macOS users while continuing to advocate for Windows support.'

Palette Gear also points out that while Palette does has 'limited support' on Capture One 9.3 and 10, it recommends using Capture One 11 or 12 for the best possible experience. Below is a list of Capture One functions Palette includes 'comprehensive support' for as well as the hundreds of other functions:

• Tonal adjustments: exposure, white balance, levels, high dynamic range, and more
• Detail adjustments: clarity, sharpening & noise reduction, grain, and more
• Tagging and rating: Assign a specific tag or rating with a single button press; Increment ratings and cycle through color tags
• Universal control: Use a single Palette dial to adjust any C1 slider, simply by hovering over it
• Slider module support: Palette sliders can now be assigned to C1 functions; Set custom range for each slider
• Multi-function dial support: Press and turn for coarse control, press to reset

In addition to a software update to bring Capture One compatibility to older Palette kits, Palette Gear has also created a new Capture One Kit that includes one core with a color screen, four buttons, four dials, and two sliders. Like other kits, it's entirely plug-and-play via Micro USB. It's currently priced at $349.99 and will eventually get bumped hip to $409.96, according to Palette Gear's product page.

For more information on the update, head over to Palette Gear's dedicated Capture One product page.

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JayM
4 days ago
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Oooh
Atlanta, GA
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