SVP Technology at First Data Corp; large scale system architecture, infrastructure, tech geek, reading, learning, hiking, GeoCaching, ham radio, married, kids
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How to efficiently free up space and recover lost storage on your Mac

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As our devices continually improve at capturing rich content like 4K video and bursts of high quality photos in a few seconds, and applications become increasingly powerful (and larger), our Macs often fill up faster than we expect.

There is always the option to offload your data to external drives or to iCloud Drive (or other cloud services), but it is often convenient or just preferred to have your information stored locally. After the break we’ll look at the most efficient ways to free up space on your Mac.

more…


Filed under: Apple Tagged: Mac




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JayM
1 hour ago
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du -s / | sort -n ... then whenever sub directory... if I remember off the top of my head correctly... OmniDiskSweeper looks free and useful as well.
Atlanta, GA
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Discover Your New Favorite Art Supplies with ArtSnacks (Sponsored)

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Are you stuck in a creative rut? Maybe you’re drawing a blank when you sit in front of your canvas, or you’ve been coloring with the same boring markers every time you open your sketchbook. Crush your creative block and discover your new favorite art supplies with ArtSnacks: a subscription box of unique, high-quality art supplies.

Every month, ArtSnacks subscribers discover new products, limited-edition tools, exclusive supplies, and useful techniques through their subscriptions, as well as online. All of the products in the boxes are tested and curated by artists, so they’ll be sure to inspire.

Subscribers are encouraged to create an original work of art using only the supplies in their monthly box, and share it with the rest of the ArtSnacks Community – appropriately called the #ArtSnacksChallenge.

Signing up is quick and easy. Use coupon code COLOSSAL to get 10% off your first month of ArtSnacks! Learn more here.

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JayM
2 hours ago
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Why do I get the feeling these are just overstocked items?
Atlanta, GA
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"Couple interesting facts you probably won’t hear on Fox… Since 2001 the FBI has warned us of over 50..."

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“Couple interesting facts you probably won’t hear on Fox…
Since 2001 the FBI has warned us of over 50 Islamist terror attacks. There have been 25.
In that same time the FBI warned us of 0 right-wing domestic terror attacks.
There have been 34.”

- Mindy Fischer
(via quakerjoe)
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JayM
2 hours ago
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Atlanta, GA
skittone
2 hours ago
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Show 322: Can We Put An End To Stupid Network Tricks?

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Engineers are often compelled to do stupid network tricks to overcome application design issues. These tricks introduce fragility and dont fix underlying problems. Can we stop? The post Show 322: Can We Put An End To Stupid Network Tricks? appeared first on Packet Pushers.




Download audio: http://feeds.packetpushers.net/-/258880956/0/packetpushersfatpipe.mp3
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JayM
5 hours ago
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Yes! I am so sick of RHI for 1980s and 1990s technology that can only support a single IP address... and forget about active/active to different IPs in different data centers so that you know from the client to the server on both paths, is actually working and available. Instead, let's overspend on overly complex networks that have propensity to fail in unique ways and take longer to fix and build in the first place. *sigh*

I can't even listen you the podcast as it would just depress me.
Atlanta, GA
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PBS KIDS debuts a new channel and live TV service, available via web and mobile

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pbskids The way children watch TV is changing – shifting away from the big screen in the living room to tablets and other mobile devices. In order to better cater to the needs of this more digital audience, PBS has now launched a new 24/7 TV channel, PBS KIDS, which is available on television through PBS member stations, but also as a streaming service via the web and the PBS KIDS app.… Read More






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JayM
5 hours ago
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Atlanta, GA
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The Most Popular Theory About What Causes Obesity May Be Very Wrong

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You've heard it over and over again: The obesity crisis, which affects more than a third of US adults and costs the country hundreds of billions of dollars every year, is due to the fact that people eat more calories than they expend. In other words, one of the leading causes of preventable deaths is rooted in gluttony and sloth. If people jogged more and ate fewer Big Macs, they wouldn't get obese.

What if that idea is just wrong? Gary Taubes thinks it is. Taubes joined us on the most recent episode of Bite to talk about the flaws in this popular idea of how we get fat.

 

As a journalist and author, Taubes has devoted his career to understanding how what we eat affects our weight. Taubes sees serious flaws in the "energy-balance theory"—that you just have to eat less and move more to stave off the pounds—and thinks that the idea is seriously undermining the fight against obesity. The more nutritionists and doctors promote that theory, he argues, the more they avoid talking about what Taubes sees as a more convincing cause of our public health woes: sugar.

Taubes traces the roots of the energy-balance theory in his new book, The Case Against Sugar. In the 1860s, German scientists invented a calorimeter which measured how many calories a person consumed and then used up. This innovation helped inform the "new" nutrition science of the early 1900s: "You could measure the energy in, you could measure the energy out," Taubes explains. "Clearly if someone was getting fatter, they were taking in more energy than they expended. From this came this theory that obesity was an energy-balance disorder."

But in the 1960s, researchers developed radioimmunoassay, allowing them to measure the circulation of hormones in the blood. Scientists could soon establish how hormones regulate the fat we accumulate, and how the food we eat influences those hormones. But at that point, notes Taubes: "The obesity and nutrition community continues to say, 'look, we know why people get fat: It's because they take in more calories than they expend.'"

That stubborn theory—Taubes sarcastically deems it "the gift that keeps on giving"—prevails even today. As my colleague Julia Lurie pointed out in this story, junk food companies use this idea in order to peddle sugary foods to kids. In one lesson of Energy Balance 101, a curriculum backed by companies like Hershey and PepsiCo and taught to 28 million students and counting, students learn that going for a bike ride can balance out munching on a chocolate bar.

The problem with this mentality, Taubes and numerous doctors and scientists argue, is that it ignores the way certain ingredients play a unique role in the way our bodies develop fat. Sugar is metabolized differently, and it doesn't trigger the hormone that tells us when we're full. Doctor Robert Lustig argues that too much sugar causes metabolic syndrome, a condition linked to heart disease, diabetes, and other chronic illnesses.

So if obesity isn't an energy-balance disorder, but is rather a metabolic defect, says Taubes, "you have to fix the hormonal thing." And "the way you start fixing it is you get rid of all the sugar in your diet."

Taubes realizes all of this is such a bummer to swallow. He's written a book that's "the nutritional equivalent of stealing Christmas," he writes. So I wanted to know, if not sugar, what's his vice? You'll have to listen to the episode to find out.

Bite is Mother Jones' podcast for people who think hard about their food. Listen to all our episodes here, or subscribe in iTunes, Stitcher, or via RSS.

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skittone
8 hours ago
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JayM
9 hours ago
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Atlanta, GA
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